Wednesday, November 12, 2008

"Red Glass" - SOLD

My internet has been acting a little funky. I painted this yesterday, but could not post it till now.

I was asked what boards I use. I actually don't buy canvas boards or panels from an art store. I think they are nice, but I have always been in the habit of just cutting and priming boards myself. I generally use MDF (but I think I am going to switch to Masonite). I try to put at least three coats of gesso using a seven inch squeegee so that I can get a nice smooth surface to paint on. This is the way I was taught how to prep boards, and have done it ever since. Sometimes on the last top layer I will lay the board flat on the ground and spray a thin film of water on top and let that dry. Once that is dry, the surface is usually really smooth...except for the time I went back outside and found twelve little gnats stuck to the nice white surface.

8 comments:

Mary Sheehan Winn said...

I like picking them off the finished painting after it dries ;)
Your subtlety is powerful.
Your work says, 'less is more'.

Barbara M. said...

Hi Aaron,

This is gorgeous. So MDF doesn't warp?
Good to know.

Barbara

aaronlifferth said...

I haven't seen MDF warp unless it has major water damage. Even large paintings done on MDF seem to stay straight.

And, as always, thanks for the nice comments.

MattR said...

Aaron-- your work is great.


Do you paint full time, or do you have to have another job?

What galleries do you show your work at?

Do you teach art lessons or workshops?

Thanks

Sorrentino said...

You really have a unique way of using shape in your paintings! Very inspiring!

Kelley Carey MacDonald said...

Your way with glass is truly inspiring!

Taryn Day said...

I love the colors here- so much so that I went to IKEA last night to buy lots of colored glass, with you as my inspiration.
I love the way you've painted the orange, too.
A squeegee, huh? I love ultra smooth surfaces too, so I'll have to try it.

mckelveystudio said...

Aaron,

Your work is beautiful, I can't get enough of your brushstrokes. Keep painting...